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  • Imagine that it’s 1987, 33 years after the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled in Brown vs. Board of Education that enforced legal segregation of public accommodations must end with “all deliberate speed,” that the last white-only public school finally closed. Ridiculous, right?
  • The country saw and heard chilling testimony Tuesday from ordinary people whose lives Donald Trump’s lies turned upside down. Georgia election workers Shaye Moss and her mother, Ruby Freeman, testified during Tuesday’s hearing of the Jan. 6 House Select Committee hearings.
  • For nearly 50 years, most of New York City has simply said “no” to meaningful affordable and fair housing development.
  • Gov. Hochul’s Penn Station Area Civic and Land Use Improvement Project is speeding toward a vote this summer.
  • Twenty years ago, Mayor Bloomberg did something virtually unprecedented: He testified before a New York City Council Committee. The committee in question was the Education Committee, which I chaired at the time, and Bloomberg did so to address one of his top priorities: obtaining control over the city’s public schools, which were then managed by a board that was unaccountable to voters.
  • New York City’s emergence as a global tech hub is undeniable: Today, our city is home to more than 9,000 tech startups, and more than 370,000 tech-related jobs.
  • Most of us know by now that Juneteenth commemorates the day when Union general Gordon Granger informed enslaved African Americans of Galveston, Texas, of their freedom on June 19, 1865. More than two months after Robert E. Lee surrendered his Confederate forces at Appomattox, Va., and two years after the Emancipation Proclamation, slavery ended in one sense.
  • These past several weeks have been near-apocalyptic for the cryptomarkets. In 24 hours, the market capitalization for cryptocurrencies fell by 12%, dropping from $1.1 trillion to $970 billion. We’ve seen some stablecoins — cryptocurrencies that are supposedly secured by other assets to decrease price volatility — fail catastrophically, defaulting appallingly on their promise to maintain a fixed value. The price of Bitcoin slid to $20,000, down almost 70% from its former high of $66,000 last year. Celsius, a major cryptocurrency lending firm, halted transactions and is seemingly preparing for bankruptcy. And Coinbase is laying off 1,100 employees from its crypto exchange.
  • Today is World Refugee Day, a date with additional significance this year as the United Nations announced a record 100 million people are displaced globally. The scale is hard to imagine, but its impact reverberates throughout our political debates and our communities.
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